Certification & Affiliations

Greenwood Industries commitment to excellence manifests itself in many forms, including support of and active participation in numerous federal, local government, and industry-related organizations.

Learn more »

Contact Us

Contact Us

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Green Roofing

A Green Roof is a roof of a building that is partially or completely covered with vegetation and a growing medium, planted over a waterproofing membrane. It may also include additional layers such as a root barrier and drainage and irrigation systems. (The use of “Green” refers to the growing trend of environmentalism and does not refer to roofs which are merely colored green, as with green roof tiles or roof shingles.)

Also known as “living roofs”, Green Roofs serve several purposes for a building, such as absorbing rainwater, providing insulation, creating a habitat for wildlife, and helping to lower urban air temperatures and combat the heat island effect. There are two types of Green Roofs: intensive roofs, which are thicker and can support a wider variety of plants but are heavier and require more maintenance, and extensive roofs, which are covered in a light layer of vegetation and are lighter than an intensive green roof.

The term green roof may also be used to indicate roofs that use some form of “green” technology, such as a cool roof, a roof with solar thermal collectors or photovoltaic modules. Green roofs are also referred to as eco-roofs, oikosteges, vegetated roofs, and living roofs.

Green roofs are used to:

  • Reduce heating (by adding mass and thermal resistance value)
  • A 2005 study by Brad Bass of the University of Toronto showed that green roofs can also reduce heat loss and energy consumption in winter conditions.
  • Reduce cooling (by evaporative cooling) loads on a building by fifty to ninety percent especially if it is glassed-in so as to act as a terrarium and passive solar heat reservoir — a concentration of Green Roofs in an urban area can even reduce the city’s average temperatures during the summer
  • Reduce storm water runoff— see water-wise gardening
  • Natural Habitat Creation — see urban wilderness
  • Filter pollutants and carbon dioxide out of the air which helps lower disease rates such as asthma— see living wall
  • Filter pollutants and heavy metals out of rainwater
  • Help to insulate a building for sound; the soil helps to block lower frequencies and the plants block higher frequencies
  • If installed correctly many living roofs can contribute to LEED points
  • Increase agricultural space

Financial benefits

  • Increase roof life span dramatically
  • Increase real estate value

Client Testimonials

"Each of the projects had many difficulties and challenges and we were especially pleased with Greenwood’s persistence and efficiency during the construction phase."

Edward Stewart, Gale Associates